policymic:

7 ways we can fix gender inequality other than with confidence

The most recent encouragement to just “fake it til you make it” comes from Katty Kay and Claire Shipman who published a feature on the “confidence gap” in the Atlantic. In the undoubtedly well-meaning piece, Kay and Shipman share troubling research outlining an equally gloomy picture: Women undervalue their accomplishments, and it’s holding them back in the workplace.

Although it’s true that some women suffer from more self-defeating thoughts and lower self-esteem, gender inequality can’t be reduced to mental health issues. Women’s lack of opportunities in the workplace are due to much deeper issues, and it’s time we admit that. Instead of telling women to change their personalities, maybe it’s time we take a look at the entire system.

Here’s a (non-exhaustive) list of ways we can help women that don’t include telling them just to hold their head up high. 

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"Miu Miu," Anna Konecna photographed by Marsa for Spur magazine May 2014

(Source: wildthicket, via donutguts)

mallgothphase:

Kelly Osbourne, “Shut Up”

teenboystuff and I are chilling IRL right now and ~reminiscing~ on 2002 Kelly Osbourne

"

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

"

- excerpt from “FYI, I Cannot “Demand” Respect From Men so Stop Telling Me That!" @ One Black Girl. Many Words.  (via fajazo)

(Source: daniellemertina, via ceedling)

artificialcreativity:

Patti Jordan

(via midwest-monster)